3.29.2006

Word of the Year

Bet you don't know what it is? I'll give you a hint ~ it's a word I hope my daughter grows up to appreciate.

Integrity

That was the most researched word of 2005 according to Merriam Webster online.

Here's the definition: firm adherence to a code of especially moral or artistic values: incorruptibility.

It's an important word, don't you think? Especially in today's world. I only hope my daughter grows up to be a great example of that word. That she always stands up for herself and her beliefs. That she has the confidence and the self-esteem to persevere. That she has the courage to speak out and not be bullied. That she is never made to feel ashamed or embarrassed because of her emotions.

I didn't have much integrity growing up. I never believed in myself the way I should have. I never appreciated my good qualities. I never stood up for myself. I was a doormat. My friends, my boyfriends, my family ~ I never wanted to disappoint them. I did what I was told and never asked questions.

It's an important word for every little girl. I am terrified of what the world is going to be like when my daughter becomes a teenager. Having strong morals, a sense of pride, knowing the difference between right and wrong ~ those are the things that are going to keep her safe. Well, along with an overprotective father!

It's a scary world out there. So, what do you say? How about we make a promise to our daughters. Let's teach them about pride, confidence, self-respect and ... integrity!!

14 comments:

rhonda said...

That sounds like a great promise :)

~d said...

I am raising boys. I have OFTEN said that my boys WILL have respect and manners. If they happen to pick up an education along the way: great. This is tough different world than the one we were kids in. I 'knew' anyone older than me deserved respect if for NO other reason than b/c s/he had been on this earth longer than I. Good Luck with the intergrity. I hope we both can mold a change for our future.

chelle said...

Very well said! I want the same for my daughter too!

Sandra said...

I want that for my daughter too. I only hope she doesn't make the same mistakes I did. Like you, I was the doormat. I wanted everyone to like me and I didn't want to ever say "NO", so as not to disappoint anyone.
Since I lived most of my life that way, it's harder as an adult to try and change and the minute I started becoming assertive and trying to stand up for myself, people would take it as a joke......it's hard to change it, so I am hoping my daughter learns now how to have integrity.

Awesome Mom said...

I think it isimportant for all kids to learn this concept and I plan on teaching my boys it.

MrsFortune said...

I'm with ya. I never had any, always wanted to please. Now it is the most important thing in the world to me.

Petite Mom Blogger said...

Looking back, I don't think I really grew up with it either. I am also raising two boys and I want it for them as well. I'll make this promise for my boys!

Nicole said...

That's a tall order, but I'm going to do my best. I've only gotten better at it as I got older (many years of therapy).

JayMonster said...

Now this is kind of funny, I agree with the general concepts of what you want for your daughter. And of course I am the overprotective father.

But (knew that was coming didn't you), the reason (I believe) is that "integrity" is far too easy a concept to twist into what you (no not "you" the general you) want it to mean.

For example. You (yes you) say that you were a doormat to friends and family, and that was proof that you did NOT have integrity. However it could easily be argured that your loyalty to your loved ones WAS a form of integrity.

I would love to be able to offer an alternative, but alas I am just not that scholarly, so I will stick with agreeing with teaching "pride, confidence and self-respect"

Cityslicker Mom said...

good word! and very underrated,too.

Nancy said...

I like this idea as well. I see what Jaymonster is saying, though -- to those of us who aimed to please as children, *that* in and of itself was a form of integrity (loyalty). Maybe the key is to teach our children independent thinking and analysis so that they can make the best decision in any circumstances, while adhering to the foundation of morals they've learned -- and stand by their decision no matter what adversity they face.

But yeah, just saying "integrity" is much shorter. ;-)

Praying for your Prodigal said...

Absolutely! And the best teaching tool...modeling integrity!

Diane

something blue said...

Giving our children the ability to face the future head on, full blast with courage and integrity is a brilliant plan.

Let's do it!

movin'mom said...

I love this post and I love jaymonster's take on the word. I have to say that I was probably one of the people who researched the word in 2005 for my 2 teens. This is a word that we discuss on a regular basis in my home. But we discuss it in a different context. For us it is crucial that our kids understand the word as a part of building up the trust between us. Anytime they get "in trouble" We question their integrity. We put a lot of stress on knowing the difference between right and wrong and then making the right choices when NOONE is watching. Our question is always would you have thrown that shoe at your brother if I had been standing there...of course they say no....and then we tell them that they need to show integrity to earn out trust so that when they are of age to go out with friends(which they now are) and drive a car (almost there) we don't question ourselves as parents as to whether or not they will make the right choices. Boy I guess it's a good thing there isn't a word limit huh? I may have to BLOG about this as well.